<div dir="ltr">Hello list,<div>I know this is far fetched, but is there a method to simulate temperature effects in circuits? Specifically, I would like to look closer to oven stabilization, which I have implemented before, but designed on a completely empirical level. </div><div>That is, I first tried on/of control (opamp with no feedback), then I tried simple proportional control and finally added a capacitor to reduce the loop bandwidth, all on the breadboard, with 15-20 minutes required for each experiment, and it was fairly hard to visualise the data (looking for a 30-50mV signal on a scope over the course of 20 minutes...).</div><div>Are there any realistic alternatives to trial and error? Could SPICE do such a thing? Or perhaps are there some thermal models I could load up in Matlab and design a controller around it? I don't know enough about control to extract these by experimenting, but I think I can handle it if there's some transfer functions already available for me to play with.</div><div><br></div><div>Just for reference, I attach the circuit I came up with last time, and its measured output during power up. To calibrate, the circuit is first powered with heat enable disconnected, and the voltage of the diode connected transistor is measured. The voltage of T_ref is set 50mV or so above that, then heater enable is connected. This sets the operating point at 50C or so.</div><div>This module has a couple of rookie mistakes, such as using the rails directly as voltage references, but I think they are irrelevant to the question itself so let's try to ignore them 😂</div><div><br></div><div><img src="cid:ii_knmylnfv0" alt="image.png" width="538" height="323"><br></div><div><img src="cid:ii_knmylyac1" alt="image.png" width="542" height="364"><br></div><div><br></div><div>On off control</div><div><img src="cid:ii_knmz44zm2" alt="image.png" width="495" height="300"><br></div><div>Opamp output at startup</div><div><img src="cid:ii_knmz4qga3" alt="image.png" width="492" height="369"><br></div><div>opamp output at steady state</div><div><img src="cid:ii_knmz59cp4" alt="image.png" width="466" height="327"><br></div><div><br></div><div>it's interesting that this waveform was 80hz or so, and the duty cycle was depended on the temperature reference. Touching the chip (therefore changing its thermal properties) changed this frequency.</div></div>