<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252">
<style type="text/css" style="display:none;"> P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} </style>
</head>
<body dir="ltr">
<div style="font-family:Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size:10pt; color:rgb(0,0,0)">
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin:0in 0in 8pt;line-height:16.8pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri, sans-serif;margin-bottom:0in;background:#ECF3F7">
<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Arial",sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";color:black">What about patch cord capacitance<span style="mso-spacerun:yes"> </span>and those 1k series resistors often used on synthesizer module outputs:<span style="mso-spacerun:yes"> 
</span>PATCH CORD CAPACITANCE may well matter. <br>
<br>
The 1k series output resistor was not really for protecting the outputting op-amp from damage (very unlikely), nor was the automatic “mixing” (often touted) of much importance. [It did assure that something well-defined happened contrary to an ill-designed
 chance occurrence of two op-amp outputs being (inadvertently) directly connected! Also, a somewhat similar moderate output impedance (600 ohms) was common in audio signal work. And the 1k’s were obviously never suggested for the lines carrying a main-control-voltage
 (volts /oct.) .]<br>
<br>
Two useful things: First, the SDIY experimenter frequently (typically) has his/her ”synthesizer” (finished modules) driving an external breadboarded module under test (MUT). For example, a finished VCO might be modulating a new VCO MUT. Things are not working
 – no surprise. Then to your horror you see that your good VCO has also now stopped - what have you done!<br>
<br>
Well, if you had the 1k series resistor your finished VCO would at least be running happily regardless of what is going on in the connected VCO MUT. (Op-amps generally drive anything if isolated by 1k). Without the 1k, a wiring error (perhaps a breadboard short
 to ground) may well get back into your finished VCO, causing confusion as well as anxiety.<br>
<br>
The second useful function of the 1k series resistors is that they “decouple” capacitive (typically shielded cables at perhaps C=100 pfd/meter) loads from op-amp outputs</span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"> thus
 preventing spurious high-frequency (MHz) oscillations WITH ASSOCIATED DC SHIFTS. Connecting a cable (even just to a scope) directly to an op-amp output forms an RC low-pass (R being the inherent INTERNAL op-amp output resistance of perhaps 100 ohms). Such
 an oscillation is HF but low level (slew limited) and non-symmetric (non-symmetric slew limiting). The result is a fuzzy looking scope trace (looks out of focus) and is only there when a cable IS attached, and as a VCO control can cause a small but noticeable
 pitch shift.</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin:0in 0in 8pt;line-height:16.8pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri, sans-serif;margin-bottom:0in;background:#ECF3F7">
<span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Arial",sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";color:black"><br>
The oscillation occurs because the R is internal to the op-amp and the RC is INSIDE any feedback loop and contributes excessive phase shift. With the 1k series the RC (R now 1k) is OUTSIDE the op-amp’s feedback loop.<span style="mso-spacerun:yes"> 
</span>Fuzzy trace and pitch shift gone.<br style="mso-special-character:line-break">
</span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"><br>
</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin:0in 0in 8pt;line-height:16.8pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri, sans-serif;margin-bottom:0in;background:#ECF3F7">
<span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;">(previously posted – in large part here, or on</span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"> 
</span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;">MW?)</span><b style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; font-style: inherit; font-variant-ligatures: inherit; font-variant-caps: inherit;"><o:p> </o:p></b><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Arial",sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";color:black"><br>
</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin:0in 0in 8pt;line-height:16.8pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri, sans-serif;margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:0in;margin-left:.5in;background:#ECF3F7">
<b><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Arial",sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";color:black"><o:p> </o:p></span></b></p>
<span style="font-size:12.0pt;line-height:107%;font-family:"Arial",sans-serif;mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";color:black;mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">- Bernie
<br style="mso-special-character:line-break">
<br style="mso-special-character:line-break">
</span><br>
</div>
</body>
</html>