<div dir="ltr">In classical ottoman music, which uses microtones, the tone is divided into nine intervals (koma), which is roughly 25 cents. I remember reading in Aristoxenus' "harmonics" that the minimum interval that a human ear can discern (in the context of musical performance) is 1/3 of a semitone (roughly 33 cents). I have an instrument with movable frets, and glissandi that go through the semitones with 3 or 4 intervals sound fairly smooth.<div>I think the only way to answer your question is by identifying the computational bottlenecks and experiment with reducing fidelity to see what happens. A 5 cent error in retuning is borderline acceptable I think, but having harmonics go out of tune (compared to the original sample) could become a game-breaker. 1-2 cents on an octave that is played simultaneously will produce a beat and that can be easily picked up by most listeners.</div><div>It'd be interesting to listen to some samples of what you have already and maybe some examples of what happens when you reduce sampling time or frequency resolution. I'm intrigued.</div><div><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Thu, 15 Apr 2021 at 12:39, Mike Bryant <<a href="mailto:mbryant@futurehorizons.com">mbryant@futurehorizons.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Thanks - interesting read.   What I'm doing is sort of like a polyphonic version of that.   At the moment I use a large array of processors to analyse the incoming signal in 100uS time intervals and 1 cent pitch intervals, so 128,000,000 bins per second.  This produces tables of frequency, phase and amplitude to drive a set of wavelet generators and works well once I parse just the highest level bins.  You can put any sound into it and what comes out sounds much like going in, and can be shifted up and down in frequency, or modified as desired.  But it can't do this in anything like real-time so trying to see what I can do to both speed things up and cut down the processing power needed whilst still keeping the sound fidelity.  <br>
<br>
Main problem is I'm absolutely tone deaf which has always been a bit of a handicap over the past fifty years :-)<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
-----Original Message-----<br>
From: Joan Touzet [mailto:<a href="mailto:music@atypical.net" target="_blank">music@atypical.net</a>] <br>
Sent: 15 April 2021 02:12<br>
To: Mike Bryant; <a href="mailto:synth-diy@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a><br>
Subject: Re: [sdiy] Question for those with musical ears<br>
<br>
Interesting. Context helps, thanks!<br>
<br>
Personally I can hear the difference between pitches @ about 5 cents off, with a great deal of effort, but I don't have perfect pitch. I've heard the 1 cent claim too, but never actually seen it demonstrated.<br>
<br>
You might want to look at what Brian Kaczynski has done with his ACO100<br>
(analogue) and the DACO160/UniSyn (digital):<br>
<br>
  <a href="https://secondsound.com/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://secondsound.com/</a><br>
<br>
He's been through quite a few iterations on the device. Second guessing from the datasheet/schematic, he's using a 24-bit, 96 kHz DAC for generating saw/square/sine, but for the pitch/env output CVs he's using the STM32F303's built-in 12-bit DACs.... so maybe 4096 steps is sufficient?<br>
<br>
Hope this helps,<br>
Joan<br>
<br>
On 14/04/2021 20:45, Mike Bryant wrote:<br>
> Yes I saw the Wikipedia entry, but I’ve seen other articles saying <br>
> those with perfect pitch can determine a cent change.  But this would <br>
> need<br>
> 12000 discrete steps which does sound unlikely.<br>
> <br>
>  <br>
> <br>
> Beats don’t matter in my case – it’s actually analysing a signal input <br>
> so I need to know how many bins are needed to handle a glissando such <br>
> that it sounds the same on reconstruction.<br>
> <br>
>  <br>
> <br>
> *From:*Synth-diy [mailto:<a href="mailto:synth-diy-bounces@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">synth-diy-bounces@synth-diy.org</a>] *On Behalf <br>
> Of *Joan Touzet<br>
> *Sent:* 15 April 2021 01:40<br>
> *To:* <a href="mailto:synth-diy@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a><br>
> *Subject:* Re: [sdiy] Question for those with musical ears<br>
> <br>
>  <br>
> <br>
> Wikipedia has a decent summary:<br>
> <br>
>     The JND for tone is dependent on the tone's frequency content. Below<br>
>     500 Hz, the JND is about 3 Hz for sine waves, and 1 Hz for complex<br>
>     tones; above 1000 Hz, the JND for sine waves is about 0.6% (about 10<br>
>     cents <<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cent_(music)" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cent_(music)</a>>).^[3]<br>
>     <<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-noticeable_difference#cite_note-3" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-noticeable_difference#cite_note-3</a>><br>
>     The JND is typically tested by playing two tones in quick succession<br>
>     with the listener asked if there was a difference in their<br>
>     pitches.^[4]<br>
>     <<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-noticeable_difference#cite_note-Olson-4" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-noticeable_difference#cite_note-Olson-4</a>><br>
>     The JND becomes smaller if the two tones are played simultaneously<br>
>     <<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simultaneity_(music)" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simultaneity_(music)</a>> as the listener<br>
>     is then able to discern beat frequencies<br>
>     <<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(acoustics)" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(acoustics)</a>>. The total number<br>
>     of perceptible pitch steps in the range of human hearing is about<br>
>     1,400; the total number of notes in the equal-tempered scale, from<br>
>     16 to 16,000 Hz, is 120.^[4]<br>
>     <br>
> <<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-noticeable_difference#cite_note-Ol" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Just-noticeable_difference#cite_note-Ol</a><br>
> son-4><br>
> <br>
> <br>
> 1400 steps is only 10.5 bits of resolution, but... the issue I'd see <br>
> is dealing with beats, either in a polyphonic synth (beats with other<br>
> voices) or with other instruments in the same song.<br>
> <br>
>  <br>
> <br>
> On 2021-04-14 8:26 p.m., Adam Inglis (synthDIY) wrote:<br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>         On 15 Apr 2021, at 9:47 am, Mike Bryant <<a href="mailto:mbryant@futurehorizons.com" target="_blank">mbryant@futurehorizons.com</a>> <mailto:<a href="mailto:mbryant@futurehorizons.com" target="_blank">mbryant@futurehorizons.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> <br>
>          <br>
> <br>
>         Consider a continuous glissando played on an analogue synth - the frequency rises smoothly between the start and end pitches.<br>
> <br>
>          <br>
> <br>
>         But on a digital synth there will always be discrete steps <br>
> between successive frequencies as the frequency is gradually stepped between the start and end pitches.<br>
> <br>
>          <br>
> <br>
>         Question is, what is the minimum step (in cents) needed such <br>
> that the best musical ears cannot tell the frequency isn't rising smoothly as on the analogue synth, but in many discrete steps.<br>
> <br>
>          <br>
> <br>
>         It may be that the rate of change can effect it so if so please assume a glissando starting at middle C rising at 1 second per semitone.<br>
> <br>
>          <br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>     So, you're kind of talking about the auditory equivalent of a video “frame-rate”, are you? <br>
> <br>
>     As in, How slow can the frames per second get before you notice a ‘flicker’?<br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>     A<br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>      <br>
> <br>
>     _______________________________________________<br>
> <br>
>     Synth-diy mailing list<br>
> <br>
>     <a href="mailto:Synth-diy@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">Synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a> <mailto:<a href="mailto:Synth-diy@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">Synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a>><br>
> <br>
>     <a href="http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy</a> <br>
> <<a href="http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy</a>><br>
> <br>
>     Selling or trading? Use <a href="mailto:marketplace@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">marketplace@synth-diy.org</a> <br>
> <mailto:<a href="mailto:marketplace@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">marketplace@synth-diy.org</a>><br>
> <br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Synth-diy mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Synth-diy@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">Synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a><br>
<a href="http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy</a><br>
Selling or trading? Use <a href="mailto:marketplace@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">marketplace@synth-diy.org</a><br>
</blockquote></div>