[sdiy] Advice on finding Synth/IOT/AUDIO work? job boards etc

cheater cheater cheater00social at gmail.com
Tue Mar 26 09:17:58 CET 2024


Your first and main objective here is to get a job in the first place
so you can pay rent and feed yourself. Tech job interviews used to be
a 2-3 day thing, nowadays they're at *least* four weeks and sometimes
extend to months. Since your runway is 6 weeks, you have two weeks at
*most* to find a job that is willing to interview you, assuming
success, which is like assuming success at a sweepstakes that 50
persons take part in.

Go for sure and search for jobs with technologies that have
established job markets. Go and crypto are that. Audio engineering
isn't. IoT isn't. Embedded isn't.

You need to be applying to 30 job posts a day to get to where you want
to be. Don't ask me where to find them, I'd be doing you a disservice.

Do not apply to jobs that have been posted more than a week ago.

Apply to jobs with every kind of technology you know, even slightly.
You need to burn through a bunch of interviews before you get at it.

Recruiter job posts are often more successful than applying to
companies, so if you see those, apply to them. They'll pay a little
less and will be slightly more annoying to work with, but it's even
more annoying to have to move into a storm drain.

As far as CVs and job history, in my decades long experience in
software, out of tens of thousands of companies I applied to, out of
thousands of companies I interviewed, less than ten asked for
references. Zero actually checked them. I assure you you will be going
up against people who are extremely creative when it comes to writing
CVs. While I have no need for that myself, you get my moral absolution
if you decide to play the game by the rules that have been dictated to
you by a robber-baron opportunist-capitalist market.

As you are applying to jobs try to get a part-time menial job
somewhere that isn't physically entirely exhausting, like a jeans
store or something. It won't be glorious, it won't pay for much
besides rent, but it will extend your runway immensely.

The most common cause of rejection after not being able to do the job
is wanting too much money. Most interviewers go about this
ass-backwards and just want to play a "guess the number" game where
they imagine a number, but don't tell you, and want you to guess a
number that's not one penny above the number they're thinking of, but
also not too low, because that would give them The Ick. They also hate
naming numbers because they are extremely afraid of rejection and also
hope to get you "on the cheap" - by playing a game of chicken, they
hope you'll know what their imagined number is, and they hope you'll
be anxious enough that you'll name that number minus 10%. Therefore,
during interviews, there is only one viable strategy. If asked about
your salary expectations, just say "market rates" or "I usually let
the company come back with a number - and don't worry, if I feel it's
not suitable, we can have a chat about it, no hard feelings". If they
keep pressing do not EVER name a number, be adamant, just tell them
that it's more important for you to work with smart people than to buy
a yacht. People like to hear that. You currenlty do not care how much
you'll be paid, any job in tech will be more than enough to pay for
your necessities. You can start being picky once you have enough to
last a while, and by that I mean at least 2 years.

Write a good CV that fills 2 pages exactly, no more, no less.

On Mon, Mar 25, 2024 at 8:19 PM Mike Bryant <mbryant at futurehorizons.com> wrote:
>
> I used to be R&D director for a well known audio company and what I will say is, compared with non-audio companies I was director of before, you are over-whelmed with CVs from people who a) think they are the next Rupert and say so on their CVs, and b) f***king useless once you interview them.  But they'll all take salaries 20% below the market norms.
>
> Thus chances of even getting an audio interview no matter how good you are is more down to chance.  Make your CV attractive to whatever companies around you are looking for, which may involve re-writing it to suit for each one, with a non-generic elevator pitch showing you have researched the company you are applying to.
> ________________________________
> From: Synth-diy <synth-diy-bounces at synth-diy.org> on behalf of Dan Snazelle via Synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org>
> Sent: 25 March 2024 18:49
> To: synth-diy mailing list <Synth-diy at synth-diy.org>; Peter Pearson <electrocontinuo at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [sdiy] Advice on finding Synth/IOT/AUDIO work? job boards etc
>
> thanks all for these leads! I will happily apply whether audio related or not AND whether in NYC or not.
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Synth-diy <synth-diy-bounces at synth-diy.org> on behalf of Peter Pearson via Synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org>
> Sent: Sunday, March 24, 2024 6:20 PM
> To: synth-diy mailing list <Synth-diy at synth-diy.org>
> Subject: Re: [sdiy] Advice on finding Synth/IOT/AUDIO work? job boards etc
>
> The Embedded Muse has job listings sometimes but unlikely to be audio related:
>
> https://www.ganssle.com/tem-subunsub.html
>
> On Sun, Mar 24, 2024 at 1:40 PM Chris McDowell via Synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org> wrote:
>
> Agreeing with Ben and Grant here. I just went through this process! Having a decade of "Super Synthesis" on my resume confused everyone, especially when I had it listed as concurrent with the other jobs. I used ChatGPT to help me take my relevant experience and retarget as an embedded engineer, meaning circuits, layout, firmware, bring-up. I made sure to fluff it up nice, with references to specific technologies on each job listing and a very tiny narrative describing what the job was and why I was valuable.
>
> Nobody ever gave two shits that I know how to design audio hardware. Knowing how to use Altium and STM32CubeIDE though, very valuable.
>
> Dan, thanks for the hard work on Snazzy. you were kicking butt and an inspiration when I started Super.
>
> If anyone here has advice on how to pay rent making modules, that would be welcome! lol
>
> Cheers,
> Chris
>
> > On Mar 24, 2024, at 10:58 AM, Ben Bradley via Synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org> wrote:
> >
> > I agree with Grant's suggestion, I'd suggest you (re)write your resume
> > as an embedded software engineer and you "just happened" to work on
> > music-related devices.
> >
> > There's the Music-DSP list, what little traffic it has is job
> > postings, though they're mostly academic-area jobs that generally
> > require advanced degrees.
> >
> >> On Sun, 24 Mar 2024 at 10:53, Dan Snazelle via Synth-diy
> >> <synth-diy at synth-diy.org> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hello there.
> >>
> >> I am wondering if anyone has leads on good places to find jobs—websites, job boards etc within the domain of synth, stompbox, internet of things work. I have lots of experience designing modules, stompboxes, coding C/C++ with ESP32, STM32, Arduino, etc. And a couple years of working with GoLang at a Crypto Tax company.
> >>
> >> I did nothing but run Snazzy FX for so many years that I am having the issue that many "normal" jobs see that as a mark against me, not as a good thing that I have worn so many hats over the years.
> >>
> >> Even before Snazzy FX I had years of doing audio work, and over the last few years I had a programming job. The irony is that I took the job to bring some financial stability to my life. I did not think about the fact that tech is full of lay-offs.
> >>
> >> Anyway long story short I would love to hear from others who might have leads on how to find work at other audio companies  OR who may be able to relate their experiences about how they went from synth work into a job that utilized those skills.
> >>
> >> When I try to apply for programming jobs—they see I have two years of working at a tech company. Which they do not see as enough experience. Then they see I had more than 12 years manufacturing audio products. And before that a lot of audio work. Which just seems to confuse them. I am wondering if there is a search term that might work well for people with these skills?
> >>
> >> Some people tell me my best bet is to start making modules again but as I live in NYC and have large rent it seems like that is not the quickest route to actually being able to get my rent paid.
> >>
> >>
> >> Happy to share my resume with anyone who might be able to help or who may have advice.
> >>
> >> I only have 6 more weeks of unemployment left so I am feeling as if I must figure something out quickly.
> >>
> >> thanks!
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> ________________________________
> >> From: Synth-diy <synth-diy-bounces at synth-diy.org> on behalf of Neil Harper via Synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org>
> >> Sent: Thursday, March 21, 2024 11:28 PM
> >> To: synth-diy at synth-diy.org <synth-diy at synth-diy.org>
> >> Subject: Re: [sdiy] Simple circuit challenge: |a-b|
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>> On 2024-03-21 19:14, Neil Harper via Synth-diy wrote:
> >>> On 2024-03-21 15:50, Rutger Vlek via Synth-diy wrote:> Dear list,
> >>>>
> >>>> while hobbying on an experimental design, I'm looking for a simple
> >>>> analog circuit to give me the absolute value of the difference between
> >>>> two signals (mathematically written as |a-b|).
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> can't you just put one signal into the inverting input of an op-amp and
> >>> the other signal into the non-inverting op-amp?
> >>>
> >>> if loading the signals are an issue, you can do op-amp buffers before it
> >>> and I think that configuration is called a "differential amp" and uses 3
> >>> op-amp cells. there's also dedicated IC's for diff amps, but they can be
> >>> $8-12 each and I think are only used when crazy precision is necessary -
> >>> maybe because it reduces the cumulative effects of resistor tolerance in
> >>> the 3 op-amp version?
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> /// Neil Harper
> >>> /// Every Wave is New Until it Breaks
> >>
> >> forget what I said, i didn't see the absolute value thing. i blame the
> >> internet for stealing my ability to fully read things.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> /// Neil Harper
> >> /// Every Wave is New Until it Breaks
> >>
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