[sdiy] Mac users - excellent keyboard similar to IBM

cheater cheater cheater00social at gmail.com
Tue Jun 1 13:13:36 CEST 2021


I could see a solenoid inside an electric guitar, to give power to the
strings. Trigger it via a pedal, or sequencer.

On Tue, Jun 1, 2021 at 1:11 PM cheater cheater
<cheater00social at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Ah, yeah, I can easily see the solenoid getting turned off.
>
> Cheers
>
> On Tue, Jun 1, 2021 at 12:25 PM René Schmitz <synth at schmitzbits.de> wrote:
> >
> > On 01.06.2021 02:03, cheater cheater wrote:
> > > I have no idea how that would work - I have one of those modules here
> > > - or at least very similar, using the same switch technology. I can't
> > > see any way to lock keys from being pressed like that... any clue how
> > > that might have worked?
> >
> >
> > I do remember that there was a click sound, so maybe it was a solenoid.
> > So I searched for "3270 keyboard solenoid".
> >
> > Here is some talk about that:
> >
> > https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19531157
> >
> >
> > It must have been terminals of the era of 3270/3278. Not the later
> > generation that Neils keyboard is related to.
> >
> >
> > I think I can now piece it together:
> >
> > You'd normally get the solenoid relaying to you that the key was
> > registered, I.e. the click sound you expected was generated
> >
> > by the solenoid banging against the case for each key stroke. In
> > addition to any sound from the key it self.
> >
> > When the keyboard was in the locked state, it didn't give you that
> > feedback. So you had tactile feedback that was different.
> >
> > Giving you a the impression the keyboard was "jammed", due to the lack
> > of sound. But you could still press them after all.
> >
> > Any mechanics to accomplish this would be overkill for such a purpose.
> > (Not that that has never stopped the manufacturers...)
> >
> >
> > This was mostly a "alert the operator" thing, so it wouldn't really need
> > you to prevent pushing down the keys.
> >
> > In fact you typically had to press one of the PA1/2/3 keys to unfreeze,
> > move the cursor, and continue.
> >
> >
> > So maybe this is interesting for your clicky synth keyboard idea after all:
> >
> > Put a solenoid in. And if you play out of tune or off the beat, lock the
> > keyboard.  :)
> >
> >
> > Best,
> >
> >   René
> >
> >
> > > On Mon, May 31, 2021 at 8:39 PM René Schmitz <synth at schmitzbits.de> wrote:
> > >>
> > >> There were many different types of 3270 (and compatible) Terminals.
> > >>
> > >> However the operating system must had support for this.
> > >>
> > >> A quick search revealed this:
> > >>
> > >> http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/3270.html
> > >>
> > >> "Users are generally presented with forms to fill out. The user moves
> > >> about the form with arrow, tab, and backtab keys, filling in and
> > >> correcting the various fields, and then presses the Enter key when ready
> > >> to submit the form to the mainframe. The mainframe receives a series of
> > >> data elements tagged to identify which field they belong to. When the
> > >> mainframe is not ready for input, it literally "locks" the keyboard."
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Best,
> > >>
> > >>    René
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Am 31.05.2021 um 15:56 schrieb cheater cheater via Synth-diy:
> > >>> Nope, the IBM 3270 is a beam spring keyboard. I have one here at home.
> > >>> There is no conceivable locking mechanism. I think Rene is talking
> > >>> about a Model A or even Model 01 converted to TTY. Those keyboards
> > >>> used a drive shaft that propelled the keys forward, otherwise they
> > >>> felt "stuck". If the motor wasn't on, the drive cylinder was not
> > >>> moving, and the key wouldn't operate... but I don't know if it would
> > >>> feel "stuck". I don't remember which of the ancient IBM typewriters
> > >>> had a drive cylinder, but I knew half a year ago.
> > >>>
> > >>> On Mon, May 31, 2021 at 10:34 AM Vladimir Pantelic via Synth-diy
> > >>> <synth-diy at synth-diy.org> wrote:
> > >>>> On 31.05.21 10:17, René Schmitz wrote:
> > >>>>> They look similar to the keyboards used on mainframe terminals on an IBM
> > >>>>> System 370.
> > >>>> yes, that's the keyboard my Mom had at work, together with an IBM 3270
> > >>>> terminal. as a kid I was impressed that it had F1 - F12 and PF1 - PF24 :)
> > >>>>
> > >>>> And separate RETURN (as in next line) and ENTER (send the form to the
> > >>>> mainframe) keys.
> > >>>>
> > >>>> when she had to use my PC to work from home she asked me where my ENTER
> > >>>> (send form) key was - eventually we found out it was mapped to F3 for
> > >>>> measly PC users...
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> >
> > --
> > --
> > synth at schmitzbits.de
> > http://schmitzbits.de
> >




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