[sdiy] Best & fastest envelope follower schematic.. anybody ?

Mr&MrsAccount hbissell at wowway.com
Fri Dec 17 22:41:15 CET 2021


Remember that high order filters don't come without their own baggage... 
  
They suffer from greater group delay (which could be a problem) and poor transient response (also a problem). 
  
Especially in a use where the input could start at zero or suddenly return to zero, the overshoots can be a killer. 
  
I've been making filters to isolate the fundamental of Guitars for many (now many mnay) years.   The settling times are longer than the delay of the guitar signal itself, therefore the delays... 
  
   

-----Original Message-----

From: Jean-Pierre <jpdesroc at oricom.ca>
To: 'Tom <tom at electricdruid.net>
Cc: synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org>
Date: Friday, 17 December 2021 10:39 AM EST
Subject: Re: [sdiy] Best & fastest envelope follower schematic.. anybody ?

  > This would be the digital equivalent to the single pole RC. It should be possible to get better ripple suppression by using higher order filters. Harald showed that he got a better response using a fourth-order filter. 
So.. how can I modify the C1 section to get for example a fourth-order filter ?
To do it the way the signal flows across C1 is a bit confusing..
The signal comes from the left side but the clamping comes from D1 at right side. I know how to implement high order filters in circuits but only
if I know the signal flow direction..       
  De : Synth-diy <synth-diy-bounces at synth-diy.org> De la part de Tom Wiltshire
Envoyé : 17 décembre 2021 08:37
À : Martin Klang <mars at pingdynasty.com>
Cc : synth-diy at synth-diy.org
Objet : Re: [sdiy] Best & fastest envelope follower schematic.. anybody ?     This would be the digital equivalent to the single pole RC. It should be possible to get better ripple suppression by using higher order filters. Harald showed that he got a better response using a fourth-order filter. 
 
    
 

  
 On 16 Dec 2021, at 16:26, Martin Klang <mars at pingdynasty.com> wrote:    
 I think an envelope follower with no lag is called a rectifier. Jokes aside, there are a number of options available but ultimately it comes down to filtering. For digital envelope followers, I like to use a simple exponential average (aka leaky integrator, a first-order IIR filter) on the fully rectified signal and tune the time constant to the expected input signal. Generally you want it to be fast, but not so fast as to track the waveform oscillations, even at say 20 Hz. This makes a computationally very efficient follower with predictable results.   best,   Martin   
 On 16/12/2021 01:36, Jean-Pierre Desrochers wrote:   
 Here is my goal..  
 I need a circuit that will take an AC signal and will shift level it from
a DC offset extracted from its min & max Peaks..
Ex: Suppose you have steady +/- 5v peak sine wave coming in this circuit,
The output would be the same waveform but shifted up to +5vdc.   
 So 0 to +10vdc.
That final waveform would be much usable for a 0-5vdc control voltage input
than the original AC waveform.
Now the challenge is to do the same with a level changing AC signal.  
 In the case of a steady waveform this ‘level shifter’ could be an opamp that would add half of the peak to peak voltage as an offset DC voltage,
But here I’m looking for something that will be more versatile
to handle varying level waveform.


  
     _______________________________________________
Synth-diy mailing list
Synth-diy at synth-diy.org
http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy
Selling or trading? Use marketplace at synth-diy.org           
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://synth-diy.org/pipermail/synth-diy/attachments/20211217/2514f37b/attachment.htm>


More information about the Synth-diy mailing list