[sdiy] Digital encoders missing codes in many devices - why?

Roman Sowa modular at go2.pl
Sun Aug 22 12:22:25 CEST 2021


Back in the days when ball-driven mouse was a thing, the most frequent 
and only maintenance needed was to clean up the rolls that were 
propelled by the ball. For that reason the ball compartment was easily 
accessed with no tools. After cleaning the rolls, mouse ran like new 
one. And I never had any bad experience with encoders themselves, never 
had to clean them. And they were just plastic "umbrellas" with lots of 
sticks around rotating without any casing. Theoreticaly easy to catch 
dirt and dust, but they didn't.

As for top scroll wheel of todays mice, this is total crap, everytime I 
opened a mouse there was some tiny, cheap-looking, badly designed, 
low-resolution mechanical encoder. Maybe I'm just buying too low end stuff.

Roman

W dniu 2021-08-22 o 00:07, Tom Wiltshire pisze:
> It’s true that mouse wheels are optical, and it’s also true that I’ve “fixed" them several times just by cleaning accumulated crud out of them. Being optical doesn’t make them immune to everything. They still get finger grease from mouse pads, and cat hair, and god only knows what else mixed up into a sticky grey paste that gets stuck all around the insides!
>
> To be fair to the “optical” part of the mechanism, mostly the problems seemed to stem from stuff getting stuck to the outside of the optical encoder disks, meaning that they didn’t turn reliably when the mouse ball moved - e.g the actual optical sensing was probably sill working accurately. Taking the wheels out and cleaning the muck off the edges that contact the mouse ball helps no end. The ball itself gets dirty too, of course, but this doesn’t seem to cause so much trouble until the muck transfers to the encoder wheels.
>
> At least, that’s been my experience of it.
>
> Tom
>
> ==================
>         Electric Druid
> Synth & Stompbox DIY
> ==================
>
>
>
>



More information about the Synth-diy mailing list