[sdiy] [spam] Re: Pink Tunes self-composing program.

David Bulog d2ba at xtra.co.nz
Mon Jan 8 22:35:07 CET 2018


from David Manley
> On 2/01/2018, at 11:08 am, David Manley <dlmanley at sonic.net> wrote:
> 
> Hi David,
> 
> It's not clear if your looking for the program or more music made with it?
> 
> Marvin Jones has a lot of the Polyphony magazines scanned and available here:
> 
> http://sonic.net/mjones/archive/docs/index.html#polydocs <http://sonic.net/mjones/archive/docs/index.html#polydocs>
> The source for Pink Tunes (assembly code) is in this book: 
> 
> The Source: Book of Patching and Programming, ISBN 0-933338-00-7, 1978
> 
> The chapter you want is:
> 
> https://www.dropbox.com/s/tpr9tc2cq9jxi6h/Source-Pt6.pdf?dl=1 <https://www.dropbox.com/s/tpr9tc2cq9jxi6h/Source-Pt6.pdf?dl=1>
> -Dave
> 
> P.S. Marvin worked at PAiA with John Simonton.
> 
> 
> On 12/31/17 4:04 PM, David Bulog wrote:
>> Happy New Year all!
>> Looking for more  Pink Tunes program 
>> Thanks in advance
>> David
>> 
>> "COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS, VOLUME ONE <https://www.discogs.com/Synergy-Computer-Experiments-Volume-One/master/9356>" is a recording of three different executions of a microcomputer self-composing program. The program, called Pink Tunes was written by John Simonton <https://www.discogs.com/artist/2851587-John-Stayton-Simonton-Jr>of PAIA Electronics, inc. and is an application of the stochastic process to electronic music. In simple terms, the computer is given a narrowed field of notes, durations, harmonies and the like from the total spectrum of all possibilities. The composer sets all of the musical ground rules, but then lets the computer combine and "compose" the musical elements in constantly varying ways according to stochastic, or controlled randomness structures. 
>> 
>> All of the musical manipulations are carried out within the computer in digital form. Each musical note, time duration or other parameter is represented by a specific number in digital code. It is only after the computer has finished its decision making process and output its results digitally that the code is converted into control voltages that an analog synthesizer can use. In theory, a similar program could be used to direct synthesis. 
>> 
>> The program will generate up to four-part harmonies on each run. Several passes using different synthesizer voicings for each overdub were used for these recordings. All sounds were generated by a Sequential Circuits, Ind. Prophet 5 synthesizer controlled by a PAIA 8700 6503-based microcomputer system via a specially designed Synergy System interface. Recording was done conventionally on an MCI one-inch eight-track recorder with DBX noise reduction. Mixing was through an MCI board to a Studer A80 two-track analog tape machine. All delays and echos were digitally produced using a DeltaLab DL-2 and an EMT 251 electronic reverberation system. 
>> 
>> Some more information about stochastic structures as they relate to electronic music can be found in John Simonton <https://www.discogs.com/artist/2851587-John-Stayton-Simonton-Jr>'s article about the Pink Tunes program in the July/August 1978 issue of Polyphony magazine (volume 4, number 1; Polyphony Publishing Co.; Oklahoma, City, Oklahoma). A general overview of the field including an extensive bibliography can be found in an article entitled "Compositional Applications of the Stochastic Processes" by Kevin Jones in the Summer 1981 issue of Computer Music Journal (volume 5, number 2; MIT Press; Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England). 
>> 
>> Larry Fast <https://www.discogs.com/artist/325903-Larry-Fast> 
>> August, 1981 
>> Bath, England
> 

> On 9/01/2018, at 10:20 am, Joel B <onephatcat at earthlink.net> wrote:
> 
> Where do we find the source, I went looking last night and didn’t find it online... was thinking more of trying to run it on my old Atari 400 - their are some midi adapters for those machines..
> 
> Joel
> 
> Sent from my iPhone 
> 
>> On Jan 8, 2018, at 11:45 AM, Tim Ressel <timr at circuitabbey.com> wrote:
>> 
>> I have looked at the code extensively. The concepts are easy to understand and the write up in the article is pretty good. I agree with Jay, morphing this into C code is the way to go.
>> 
>> Anybody feel like collaborating?
>> 
>> -t-i-m-b-o-
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On 1/8/2018 11:06 AM, Jay Schwichtenberg wrote:
>>> I got my copy of The Source out last night and started to look at the code. Actually think the worst way to go would be to run this in an 6502 emulator. But then I'm an embedded/bare metal HW/SW engineer that is old enough to have used the 6502.
>>> 
>>> There is no reason that the code couldn't be rewritten in C to work on some micro (ARM, Arduino, PIC). I haven't looked in detail but the only issue would be the hardware associated with the synth interface. Depending on how you want to use the software you might need voltages/gates or it could possibly just output MIDI notes.
>>> 
>>> I'll get my glasses and go read the article.
>>> 
>>> Jay S.
>>> 
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Synth-diy [mailto:synth-diy-bounces at synth-diy.org] On Behalf Of David Bulog
>>> Sent: Monday, January 08, 2018 10:44 AM
>>> To: Tom Wiltshire
>>> Cc: synth-diy at synth-diy.org
>>> Subject: [spam] Re: [sdiy] Pink Tunes self-composing program.
>>> 
>>> So can Pink Tunes be reborn to run on a modern day OS ?
>>>> On 9/01/2018, at 1:28 am, Tom Wiltshire <tom at electricdruid.net> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> I wondered about this. Assuming a 6502 running at 2MHz, if I used a modern PIC with an instruction rate at 8MHz, if I could write equivalent macros for each of the 6502 instructions in 4 instructions or less, I could basically compile the old code for the new chip.
>>>> 
>>>> It’s almost (but not quite) an interesting enough challenge to warrant giving it a try. Maybe if I had more Sundays in the week.
>>>> 
>>>> Tom
>>>> 
>>>> ==================
>>>>      Electric Druid
>>>> Synth & Stompbox DIY
>>>> ==================
>>>> 
>>>>> On 8 Jan 2018, at 07:30, David Bulog <d2ba at xtra.co.nz> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> John Titor came up because of a debate about  reusing 80’s assembly code  in modern day recreations of classics. we came to the conclusion that you would need to source all the original hardware for assembly code to be pratically useful :)
>>>>> 
>>>>>> On 8/01/2018, at 8:09 pm, Olav Martin Kvern <okvern at ix.netcom.com> wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Colleagues,
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> re: "John Titor"
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> I've never been sure if "John Titor" was an internet hoax that the visual novel/anime series "Steins;Gate" made reference to, or whether the internet hoax was created as part of the marketing program for either work. Probably the former, but you never know.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Either way, not all red herrings are created equal.:-)
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Ole
>>>>>> _______________________________________________
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>>>>> 
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>> 
>> -- 
>> --Tim Ressel
>> Circuit Abbey
>> timr at circuitabbey.com
>> 
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