[sdiy] STM and TruStudio

Ben Stuyts ben at stuyts.nl
Tue Feb 13 17:16:55 CET 2018


Hi Ben,

Professionally, I’ve been using Rowley CrossWorks (ARM and AVR versions on Mac and Windows) for the last ten years or so:

Good support. Easy setup as in just run the installer. (Then install the license and any needed CPU / Board support packages.) They have a ton of support packages for various CPU’s and dev boards. The usual blinky led examples included. They have trial/home/edu licenses too I believe. Good support for various JTAG interfaces with a good debugger, and almost no hassle to setup. I use it to develop code for mostly Cortex M0 and M3 chips from NXP, Atmel, ST and TI. GCC and Clang are used underneath as compiler. Very flexible for setting up different build configurations: I have to support different OEM’s / boards from the same source code and it’s great for that. Easier and more flexible (I think) than the configuration system in VisualStudio for example. Also, it’s nice to stay in one environment as opposed to each vendor’s free solution (and relying on other users for support). Editor needs a bit getting used to, but so does any other one too.

I’ve tried some Eclipse based solutions (paid and free) in the past too, but they were horrendous… 

Ben


> On 13 Feb 2018, at 05:34, Ben Bradley <ben.pi.bradley at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> In a related question, how do people feel about different Arm Cortex M
> development tools? What's your favorite and least favorite? A few
> years ago I was using Keil's free 32k-code-limited version for the
> STM32 boards, but I was often frustrated due to something 'breaking'
> and getting an error message that I didn't understand where it was
> coming from. I sometimes found help and fixes from online forums, but
> it was time consuming and sure felt unproductive.
> 
> On Mon, Feb 12, 2018 at 11:23 PM, Ben Bradley <ben.pi.bradley at gmail.com> wrote:
>> Renesas has recently (a few years ago) started selling Arm Cortex M
>> chips, and as I heard at a recent seminar on these, you can download a
>> free, fully functioning IAR dev system that's solely for the  Renesas
>> chips.
>> 
>> I suppose you could redo a bunch of the support code for another
>> maker's ARM Cortex M chips, but 1. that would be a lot of work, and 2.
>> it goes totally against the license for these things.
>> 
>> I've written a series of equates for various registers and I/O ports
>> for smaller parts (68HC11) before writing much of the "real" code
>> because I saw where I had a need for it, but that was almost 30 years
>> ago when software (assembler!) vendors didn't always include such
>> things. These Cortex M things are one or two orders of magnitude
>> bigger as far as the number of peripherals and number of I/O registers
>> per peripheral.
>> 
>> https://www.electronicsweekly.com/news/renesas-offers-cortex-m4-mcus-with-synergy-rtos-and-stacks-2015-10/
>> 
>> On Mon, Feb 12, 2018 at 8:00 PM,  <sleepy_dog at gmx.de> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Ha! Interesting move.
>>> https://atollic.com/truestudio/
>>> Indeed, ST logo everywhere.
>>> 
>>> i wonder whether they'll be fiddling with it so it will be harder to use
>>> other implementors' Cortex M chips. Why would they provide a well polished
>>> tool chain to enable you to use the competition's products...
>>> That would make a lot of people rather unhappy.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> - Steve
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Am 13.02.2018 um 00:02 schrieb Neil Johnson:
>>>> 
>>>> Hi all,
>>>> 
>>>> Not sure if this is widely known, but late last year STM finally
>>>> bought out Atollic, and now the previously paid-for Pro version of
>>>> their Eclipse-based software development system is now FREE for the
>>>> STM32 platform.
>>>> 
>>>> This is actually quite awesome news if you have any interest in
>>>> programming embedded micros.
>>>> 
>>>> Neil
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
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