<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 17 Feb 2022, at 22:44, Donald Tillman <<a href="mailto:don@till.com" class="">don@till.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div class="">I also may or may not remember seeing a Polycom chip block diagram.  The Polycom chip isn't designed in a modular way like most chips.  Ie., there are no recognizable subcircuits like current mirrors or diff amps.  So I don't think a block diagram would even apply.<br class=""></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>Sounds interesting! Perhaps Ken Shirriff (<a href="http://righto.com" class="">righto.com</a>) could reverse engineer the Polycom chip, just like he recently did with the DX7 one. I don’t know if anybody has any broken ones to send to him?</div><div><br class=""></div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div class="">I'd recommend the patent.  Oh I forgot, it's on my Moog Patents page!<br class=""><br class=""><a href="http://till.com/articles/moog/patents.html" class="">http://till.com/articles/moog/patents.html</a><br class=""></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div>Thanks for the link!</div><div><br class=""></div><div>Are there any discrete remake versions of the Polycom out there? </div><div><br class=""></div><div>Ben</div><div><br class=""></div></body></html>