<div dir="ltr">> That last point is really interesting. On most musical instruments, repeatedly playing the same note does NOT generate a series of identical-sounding notes, as it would on<div>> a synthesiser. I’ve never played a Polymoog…. How does this work in practice? Is it convincing/useful?</div><div><br></div><div>As an owner of a Polymoog since 1985, the velocity sensing is effective at repetitive playing - as long as you do not use the sustain pedal.  With the sustain pedal engaged, repetitive playing of a single key increases the volume with each repeated key press.  That was one of its faults.</div><div><br></div><div>They dropped the ball on the two pole VCF on the PolyCom IC in that the VCF has zero resonance capability, zero modulation (no EG, no LFO, no key tracking, no velocity), and its cutoff is varied by fixed resistors per preset.  It is merely a "brightness" filter.</div><div><br></div><div>My Polymoog is one of the later ones that are more reliable.  But as I acquired more analog polyphonics and other gear, the Polymoog saw less and less use.  I almost never use it anymore with all this cool MIDI stuff.  It still works but it is now the coffee table in my living room, as the music room in my new house has limited space.</div><div><br></div><div>MC</div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 7:06 PM Adam (synthDIY) <<a href="mailto:synthdiy@adambaby.com">synthdiy@adambaby.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-style:solid;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div><a href="http://till.com/articles/moog/patents.html" target="_blank">http://till.com/articles/moog/patents.html</a></div></div></blockquote></div><div><br></div><div>Re the Polymoog:</div>On that page it says..<div><br></div><div>“<span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:times,serif;font-size:14px">The pitches come from top octave generator ICs and flip-flop dividers, and there is a custom 16-pin chip for each key that performs various envelope, modulation, waveform mixing and 2-pole ladder VCF duties.  The chip's envelope generator is sensitive to the key velocity and also to the length of time since the key was last played."</span></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>That last point is really interesting. On most musical instruments, repeatedly playing the same note does NOT generate a series of identical-sounding notes, as it would on a synthesiser. I’ve never played a Polymoog…. How does this work in practice? Is it convincing/useful?</div><div><br></div><div>A</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div>_______________________________________________<br>
Synth-diy mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Synth-diy@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">Synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a><br>
<a href="http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy</a><br>
Selling or trading? Use <a href="mailto:marketplace@synth-diy.org" target="_blank">marketplace@synth-diy.org</a><br>
</blockquote></div>