<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class="">I just remember some summer in the early 1980s building a number of PAiA circuits, hoping it would open the doors to being able to make some good sounds. <div class="">I built the surf synthesizer and it was really wonderful. I ran it for days in the garage. </div><div class="">I tried the wind chimes synthesizer, and it sounded like someone shaking a giant glass jug fill of bamboo sticks.</div><div class="">Then I tried some of the modular circuits. </div><div class="">The 1-transistor bandpass filter, which was pretty much the same circuit used in the surf and chime circuits. </div><div class="">When I finally got to the “lowpass filter” circuit from the 2700 series, it was a dud. It was a filter in name only. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">The next summer, I hit the university library and found the Moog 904 patent diagram. After building that, I was no afraid to build the Moog VCA. </div><div class="">But making a stable, reliable VCO was for the big guys. To this day I have never made a decent VCO, but the older I get the more pointless it seems.</div><div class=""><div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On Nov 26, 2021, at 2:16 PM, Mattias Rickardsson <<a href="mailto:mr@analogue.org" class="">mr@analogue.org</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div dir="auto" class=""><div class=""><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">Brian Willoughby <<a href="mailto:brianw@audiobanshee.com" class="">brianw@audiobanshee.com</a>> skrev:<br class=""></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">One interesting side-effect of the swing VCA is that it creates a DC offset in the signal that a real VCA mostly avoids. This potential problem is removed by capacitively coupling the different audio stages together, so that any DC offset is removed. However, even an AC-coupled system can pop when the DC offset changes abruptly. For percussion sounds, though, this abrupt pop might actually be an improvement to the sound.<br class=""></blockquote></div></div><div dir="auto" class=""><br class=""></div><div dir="auto" class="">Probably also for synth sounds. Among all potential cases of people saying that "the old synth sounds better than the new version/clone/emulation/whatever", offset thumps might be one of the unknown secrets that reverse engineers often miss.</div><div dir="auto" class=""><br class=""></div><div dir="auto" class="">/mr</div><div dir="auto" class=""><br class=""></div><div dir="auto" class=""><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
</blockquote></div></div></div>
_______________________________________________<br class="">Synth-diy mailing list<br class=""><a href="mailto:Synth-diy@synth-diy.org" class="">Synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a><br class="">http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy<br class="">Selling or trading? Use marketplace@synth-diy.org<br class=""></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></body></html>