<div dir="auto"><div dir="auto"><div dir="auto"><div class="elided-text"><div dir="ltr">cheater cheater via Synth-diy <<a href="mailto:synth-diy@synth-diy.org">synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a>> skrev:<br></div><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"> I wonder what's being used in places like<br>mobile phones or wireless earbuds for example, they can't be running<br>+/-5V op amps or LV op amps with major crossover distortion.<br></blockquote></div></div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">I've used some mobile codec from Dialog to pump up the jam in a low-voltage application with mainly positive supplies, check out their stuff for some typical insight.</div><br><div class="elided-text"><div dir="ltr">Mike Bryant <<a href="mailto:mbryant@futurehorizons.com">mbryant@futurehorizons.com</a>> skrev:<br></div><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Nowadays mobile phone amplifiers are all digital - the digital audio (I2S possibly) digital signal is converted to a PDM signal which drives a class D amplifier and a simple LC reconstruction filter on the output.<br>Some years ago they did use DACs (e.g. Wolfson devices) followed by a Class D amp, until someone realised going digital -> analogue -> digital -> analogue was a nonsense.<br></blockquote></div></div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">But Class D amps are analog, right? :-)</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">/mr</div><div dir="auto"><br></div></div>