<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 1 May 2019, at 5:42 PM, Oakley Sound via Synth-diy <<a href="mailto:synth-diy@synth-diy.org" class="">synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">The actual VCO core is based around the SCR Q103. It's a linear VCO with the main timing cap C102. I believe the 555 is being used as a 'semi-fixed' monostable to produce an error CV, courtesy of IC101 pins 1, 2 & 3, that partly compensates for high frequency tracking droop and also allows some control over the overall pitch of the VCO core.</span><br style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div><div>Many thanks for this Tony. I’m not familiar with SCR-based oscillators. I had a look around the net, and found a couple that indeed use a 555, but nothing really like this one. This is more complicated. I poked around with the scope to try to get an idea of what’s happening, I’ve put the new scope shots up here along with the VCO schematic...</div><div><a href="https://mezzoauto.blogspot.com/2019/05/roland-sh-2000.html" class="">https://mezzoauto.blogspot.com/2019/05/roland-sh-2000.html</a></div><div>The keyboard is 4 octave, F to F. At F0 the VCO is around 1.5 kHz, at F4 around 11 kHz.</div><div>You can see there is a big change to the mark-space ratio between these frequencies at pin 3 of the 555. This pulse output is then integrated by the first stage of IC 101, it would seem (see pic)… but I wonder what is happening at the second stage where the negative key CV is introduced?</div><div>Any further enlightenment from anyone will be greatly appreciated!</div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div>Just for the archives:</div><div>Using three stages of a quad op-amp, I’ve managed to get useful external control of this beast. </div><div>1) Pin 8 , VCO board - inverted and scaled 8 volt CV (Hz/volt)</div><div>2) Pin 9 VCO board - 10 volt gate here manages to trigger the envelope for the VCA (on another board) as well as the the one for the PWM sweep.</div><div>3) Wiper of the Touch Sensitivity pot - gives access to the voltage buss  (0-9v) that can control volume, “wow”, “growl”, vibrato and pitch bend up or down. (Keep the pot above minimum to avoid grounding this voltage).</div><div>Roland has very thoughtfully provided a 3 position, 3 pole slide switch at the back (originally to attenuate output levels for external amplification) so this can be commandeered to switch between ext and internal control of the above.</div><div><br class=""></div><div>In addition, putting the Volume (VCA control input) of the Touch effect on a switched jack allows separate control of this (range of about 10 volts) and compensates somewhat for the lack of any envelope adjustment. This gives a very useful dynamic range all the way to silence.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div>Having now got external CV control of the VCO, I see it will go all the way down to zero, so the usable range is more than 4 octaves. It never goes out of tune.</div><div>Ext control of the “growl” (VCF modulation by a 30 Hz LFO) allows creation of new metallic timbres I’ve never heard from this synth before.</div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">Regarding the ladder filter - only the early ones had the transistor ladder, most have the five stage diode ladder. Years ago I converted my old SH2000 to a transistor ladder and although, I thought at the time, most of the presets sounded better some of them most certainly didn't. The flute and bass guitar sounded better with the diode ladder.</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""><div class="">Mine is a very early serial number, so presumably has the original filter. That “Bass” preset certainly means serious business!</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">cheers</div><div class="">Adam</div></body></html>