<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 10 Feb 2019, at 4:00 AM, MTG <<a href="mailto:grant@musictechnologiesgroup.com" class="">grant@musictechnologiesgroup.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">Not sure about that last suggestion. Old sage advice given to me when working with unknown voltage dangers: no rings and keep one hand in your pocket. No rings so you don't create shorts on your own (bracelets too I guess, etc). The one hand thing is to keep the shock from traveling across your chest (heart).</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""><div class="">Also, use the back of the fingers or hand when unsure - finger and wrist flexor muscles react more strongly than the extensor muscles to powerful shocks (you’ve heard of the scenario where the victim couldn’t release their grip when shocked…)</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">A</div></body></html>