Re stability/oscillation, all op-amps have their own stability criteria, and certain things that they will tolerate vs things that they will complain about. <br><br>Eg. Some op-amps can be wired as unity gain followers, whilst others are not stable when configured for low gains like unity. Some op-amps are happy driving capacitive loads like long cables, whilst others need some resistance in series with the output to remain stable with capacitive loads.<br><br>Most modern high-performance op-amps have a greater propensity to oscillate at MHz frequencies than old timers like the 741. Think of high-performance op-amps as like high-performance cars... You need to be a lot more careful handling a Formula 1 racing car than a family saloon. "With great power comes great responsibility."<br><br>-Richie,<br><br>Sent from my Xperia SP on O2<br><br>---- cheater00 cheater00 wrote ----<br><br><div dir="auto">Not even TL074 is a replacement for TL074 as the improved process and bandwidth today compared to the 1970s means if you replace a 1970s one with a modern one it will behave differently. My question is if someone's seen a modern op amp of the TL074 style oscillate where a 1970s version wouldn't? I think that's a good possibility but don't want to spread FUD.</div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Fri, 26 Oct 2018, 07:20  <<a href="mailto:rsdio@audiobanshee.com">rsdio@audiobanshee.com</a> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Yeah, there are literally 10,000 choices when it comes to op-amps. There are so many parameters.<br>
<br>
Sometimes, certain parameters make no difference at all in your circuit. Other times, the parameters make a small difference, so you balance the tradeoffs. Then, of course, certain circuits might demand the best possible performance in one parameter or a few, so you have to balance cost versus performance and tradeoffs with less important issues.<br>
<br>
Your best bet is to study what Jung and other have written so that you understand which parameters matter in your case, and then use something like Mouser’s parameter selection database to narrow in on a few choices out of ten thousand.<br>
<br>
When you design, stick to common op-amp packages. When you build, be sure to try out several options that have critical parameters in the range that you need. Last time I ended up going through four op-amps before finding one with low distortion and rail-to-rail performance (since I had USB 5 V power as a limit).<br>
<br>
Brian<br>
<br>
<br>
On Oct 25, 2018, at 9:11 PM, Tony K <<a href="mailto:weplar@gmail.com" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">weplar@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> Do yourself a favour and try to get your hands on Walter Jung's "IC Op-Amp Cookbook" , any edition. It's the bible on op-amp design, selection, advantages of each type etc. <br>
> <br>
> What are you trying to improve on? Noise, input bias? slew rate? Lo noise.. That aforementioned book covers all these.<br>
> <br>
> On Oct 25, 2018, at 10:31 PM, Youssef Menebhi <<a href="mailto:youssef.menebhi.79@gmail.com" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">youssef.menebhi.79@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
>> I wanted to ask, generally, to the list - if there was a simple<br>
>> replacement for the TL084/74 that would improve the overall "quality"<br>
>> of the signal. I tend to use the TL084 by default, but have always<br>
>> wondered if there would be some great improvement in using more<br>
>> precisely-designed chips. Does anyone have any experiences with this?<br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Synth-diy mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Synth-diy@synth-diy.org" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">Synth-diy@synth-diy.org</a><br>
<a href="http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy" rel="noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">http://synth-diy.org/mailman/listinfo/synth-diy</a><br>
</blockquote></div>