<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=us-ascii" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.23588"></HEAD>
<BODY>
<DIV dir=ltr align=left><SPAN class=953591920-06112018><FONT color=#0000ff 
size=2 face=Arial>Hi Rutger,</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV dir=ltr align=left><SPAN class=953591920-06112018><FONT color=#0000ff 
size=2 face=Arial></FONT></SPAN> </DIV>
<DIV dir=ltr align=left><SPAN class=953591920-06112018><FONT color=#0000ff 
size=2 face=Arial>I tempco my 2164s in filters when only using two or three VCAs 
in the core (or, for example, in an SVF where I use two in the core, one for 
VCQ, and the fourth for tempco).  However, in a Roland-esque four-stage 
filter, I generally don't do tempco.  You would essentially require two 
independent CV summers, two tempcos, and then split the core between two 2164s 
(two on each) so that each one had an unused spare.  It's probably not 
worth all the trouble, since filter cutoff doesn't require tempco, and there are 
more convenient ways to get sine waves.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV dir=ltr align=left><SPAN class=953591920-06112018><FONT color=#0000ff 
size=2 face=Arial></FONT></SPAN> </DIV>
<DIV dir=ltr align=left><SPAN class=953591920-06112018><FONT color=#0000ff 
size=2 face=Arial>Cheers,</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV dir=ltr align=left><SPAN class=953591920-06112018><FONT color=#0000ff 
size=2 face=Arial>Dave</FONT></SPAN></DIV><BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px" 
dir=ltr>
  <DIV dir=ltr lang=en-us class=OutlookMessageHeader align=left>
  <HR tabIndex=-1>
  <FONT size=2 face=Tahoma><B>From:</B> Synth-diy 
  [mailto:synth-diy-bounces@synth-diy.org] <B>On Behalf Of </B>Rutger 
  Vlek<BR><B>Sent:</B> Tuesday, November 06, 2018 7:29 AM<BR><B>To:</B> SDIY 
  List<BR><B>Subject:</B> [sdiy] 2164 tempco in VCF 
  applications<BR></FONT><BR></DIV>
  <DIV></DIV>
  <DIV dir=ltr>Hi list,
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>I've been impressed with the performance of recent VCO designs (yes, you 
  David!) using 2164 for temperature compensation. I've been wondering if people 
  have attempted similar things with respect to VCF applications? When using 
  integrators in a VCF based on the 2164 you already have an exponential control 
  law of the inputs, so wouldn't need a full exponential current source as in a 
  VCO. Can you still apply the same principle for making a VCF temperature 
  stable? Do you need that degree of stability in a VCF (yes, different opinions 
  are welcome)? And what would you do if you already used up all 4 sections of a 
  2164 in the core of the VCF, meaning you don't have another 2164 available in 
  the same (isothermic) package?</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>Regards,</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>Rutger</DIV></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>