<div dir="ltr"><div>

<div style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><div class="gmail_quote" style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255);text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">On 6 May 2018 at 23:27, Pete Hartman<span> </span><span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:pete.hartman@gmail.com" style="color:rgb(17,85,204)" target="_blank">pete.hartman@gmail.<wbr>com</a>></span><span> </span>wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><br></div><div>I have a Tek 2236A bought from a fellow list member a few years ago, but I only just recently figured out an arrangement that let me have it at my desk.  So far it hasn't gotten a lot of use, though I did have fun with X-Y mode (the DSO does a poor job of that) and Ian Fritz's double well chaos module.<br></div></div></blockquote></div><br></div><div style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">My Tek 2236 is always on my working desk, acting as a monitor stand. It's simple but decently powerful for analog audio measurements, and I love the little counter/multimeter they crammed into it. Nice to avoid having too many multimeters around cluttering your workspace. I prefer the reasonly modern analog Tektronix scopes before DSOs any day - and I very rarely need more.</div><div style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">The good old analog scope, the new RME ADI-2 Pro high-end soundcard, <span style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255);text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial;float:none;display:inline">a Metcal soldering station and a microscope</span>

 solves 99 % of my testing needs during analog design work.</div><div style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra" style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:small;font-style:normal;font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:normal;text-align:start;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><div class="gmail_quote">On 7 May 2018 at 00:40, Dennis Verschoor<span> </span><span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:modular@gmail.com" style="color:rgb(17,85,204)" target="_blank">modular@gmail.com</a>></span><span> </span><wbr>wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">I got a whole studio with just test equipment.<br><br><a href="https://www.facebook.com/Waveform-Research-Centre-1157781711025359/?_rdr" style="color:rgb(17,85,204)" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/Wavef<wbr>orm-Research-Centre-1157781711<wbr>025359/?_rdr</a><br></blockquote></div></div><br></div><div>Cool, especially if you get them to work for the musicmaking! Do you need more stuff? :-)</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 7 May 2018 at 00:49, Dave Brown <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:davebr@modularsynthesis.com" target="_blank">davebr@modularsynthesis.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div bgcolor="white" lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple"><div class="m_-3799902702714395605m_2252806148872570708WordSection1"><p class="MsoNormal"><br></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1f497d">Working at Tektronix and now at the vintageTEK museum does have its advantages.</span></p></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Speaking of museum-level gear, I still need to find a better home to a collection of over a dozen Tektronix 500 series scopes from the '50s and '60s, with lots of plugins and other equipment. Preferably in northern Europe, since they are sitting in storage in Sweden. Most museums specializing on electronic stuff around here are various radio museums, which I rarely think are very interesting and they never seem that interested in electronic measurement equipment. Any tips or recommendations on where old high-tech Tek best should end up?</div><div><br></div><div>/mr</div><div><br></div></div></div></div>