[sdiy] Some Audio DSP prototypes

Ben Stuyts ben at stuyts.nl
Sat Apr 23 23:21:21 CEST 2022


Not recently. I’ve used it many years ago to get up and running on some ST disco board. At that time it was very clunky. Also tried the online system, Mbed, but that was even worse. I couldn’t say how they compare nowadays though. I really like the debugger in CrossWorks, having all the peripheral registers in a separate window and so on, access to the host through printf/fopen/etc.

Recently I’ve been using Atmel's ATSAM controllers, using their Atmel Start to generate some code quickly to setup the peripherals. I then load that into CrossWorks and delete most of the cruft once the real work starts. I’ll try CubeIDE in the future in a similar manner once I have a need for a new ST controller <cough>unavailable</cough>.

By the way, a few days I listened to the embedded.fm <http://embedded.fm/> podcast and they had an item about setting up Visual Studio Code for Arm development. Apparently it is quite useable once you get it set up (which is not trivial, listen to the episode!). See https://embedded.fm/episodes/410 <https://embedded.fm/episodes/410> and https://mcuoneclipse.com/2021/05/01/visual-studio-code-for-c-c-with-arm-cortex-m-part-1/ <https://mcuoneclipse.com/2021/05/01/visual-studio-code-for-c-c-with-arm-cortex-m-part-1/>

Ben


> On 23 Apr 2022, at 22:07, Chris McDowell <declareupdate at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Ben, have you used CubeIDE and if so, how does Rowley compare? I downloaded a demo of Rowley at some point but got distracted before getting a working project set up. 
> 
> Chris McDowell
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Apr 23, 2022, at 11:11 AM, Ben Stuyts <ben at stuyts.nl> wrote:
>> 
>> Forgot to mention this: I think Rowley still offers a trial version (code size limited), so you could check out the most recent version with clang support.
>> 
>> Ben
>> 
>> 
>>> On 23 Apr 2022, at 17:06, Eric Brombaugh via Synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org> wrote:
>>> 
>>> That's an interesting data point. I actually bought a copy of Rowley's "personal" licensed compiler many years ago when I was starting out on ARM stuff. Ended up not using it because the licensing terms weren't favorable when I started doing outside contracts,  but I do remember that it's a quite nice tool.
>>> 
>>> Thanks for the offer of help - I'll let you know if a peek at its compile commands would be useful.
>>> 
>>> Eric
>>> 
>>>> On 4/23/22 07:30, Ben Stuyts wrote:
>>>> Just another data point:
>>>> I use a commercially supported IDE (Rowley CrossWorks, similar to Segger Embedded Studio) for my Arm projects and it supports both gcc and clang. Basically it’s just a matter of changing a global setting in the IDE and it does all the work for you. As you correctly observed, a lot of cmd-line options are similar. As long as you don’t go overboard with these (or gcc-specific pragma’s) it is very easy to convert from one to the other.
>>>> Eric, contact me if you want me to check what kind of cmd-lines it generates to run the clang compiler/linker.
>>>> Ben
>>>>> On 22 Apr 2022, at 20:37, Eric Brombaugh via Synth-diy <synth-diy at synth-diy.org> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> On 4/22/22 01:17, Gordonjcp wrote:
>>>>>> Out of interest, how hard is it to switch from gcc to LLVM, for fairly standard C code with odd sprinklings of assembler?  How much would I need to change?  If it's something fairly straightforward that a couple of #ifdefs can cope with it'd be nice to give folk the choice.
>>>>> 
>>>>> After all the noise here about Clang/LLVM I've decided to look into exactly this. I've been using GCC with a straight-forward Makefile flow, so I figured it shouldn't be too difficult. A bit of googling turned up this tutorial which is specifically for embedded ARM stuff:
>>>>> 
>>>>> https://interrupt.memfault.com/blog/arm-cortexm-with-llvm-clang
>>>>> 
>>>>> The quick summary is that LLVM can understand a great many of GCC's compiler options, and you can use GCC to give you additional details that LLVM might need. The linked article has some errors and omissions that I had to work around, but after a few hours of banging on it I've gotten one of my STMF303 projects to compile without errors.
>>>>> 
>>>>> *However* although the compile appears clean, when I try to load it onto the hardware the whole thing grinds to a halt - the linking process appears to have failed somewhere and the code isn't being flashed to the correct address. Using objcpy results in a binary file that's about 4GB in size (the .elf is only 200kB, which is comparable to the .elf I get from GCC), so there's clearly more work to do.
>>>>> 
>>>>> I'm hopeful that I can get this going at some point in order to make a more informed comparison for myself, but I've set it aside for now. I realize that the free version I'm using is apparently not the best, but I'm not shelling out kilobucks for a quick spin.
>>>>> 
>>>>> If anyone has suggestions I'd be glad to try them out, and I'll certainly post results if/when I get it going.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Eric
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
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