[sdiy] Breadboards

James Patchell patchell at cox.net
Mon Jan 2 03:33:03 CET 2006


Guess I better add my two cents to this...

I have used solderless bread boards since 1973.  I have used them to test 
out many designs...some simple...some complex.  Some of the analog...some 
of the digital...some of them both.  I have never had a single failure on 
any of the circuits...and every single one performed exactly the same when 
it was committed to a production PCB....

Now there is one funny story in there...one of the projects I did had a 
strange glitch in it that I could not figure out...the chief engineer, who 
wanted to keep to schedule, said..."Those damn solderless boards don't work 
very and is probably the source of the problem..."....well, he was 
wrong...the PC board worked exactly the same way...I still am using that 
same SBB today...if you treat them kindly...they will last a long 
time....although, it is showing its age...wonder how old it is in dog years?


At 03:09 PM 1/1/2006 -0600, megaohm wrote:


>On 1/1/06, harrybissell 
><<mailto:harrybissell at prodigy.net>harrybissell at prodigy.net> wrote:
>Why I don't use breadboards - by H^) harry
>
>
>He got a commercial prospect to come and see the design. Of course the
>solderless breadboard chose that time to fail.
>
>
>
>His mistake was not committing the circuit to perfboard before he met with 
>the commercial interest
>
>2) Long leads : make adding effective bypass capacitors close to a chip,
>difficult.
>
>
>
>This is easy for dual opamps with power at pins 4 and 8. Just use a jumper 
>from ground to the row above pin 8 and below pin 4. The long leads from 
>the cap? Clip 'em.
>
>I'm working with a professor at the Art Institute of Chicago and he hates 
>breadboards. I couldn't understand why until I tried one there. They are 
>old and abused. New breadboards don't give me those problems.
>
>A 23 year old breadboard!? Wow. I never guessed they could last so long. 
>When my boards (I have a bunch) develop bad tracks, are hard to insert 
>components, or are melted(!) , I just spend five bucks for a new one.
>
>I can see some circuits would suffer badly from the capacitance, but this 
>has happened very seldom (for me at least).
>
>I learned to always breadboard first from being disappointed by the 
>component and/or feature choice for some (most) purchased pcbs. In fact, 
>now I would never build a circuit, no matter who it was from, without 
>building it on breadboard and testing/tweaking/experimenting with it 
>first. By the time I'm finished with that, I usually don't want to use the 
>pcb anymore because the circuit might have changed (evolved/devolved) to 
>such a point that the pcb doesn't help much (for finished circuits, I'm a 
>perfboard kind of guy).
>
>The breadboard is/can be so fast. Instant gratification. Someone posted a 
>heads-up yesterday on a newer Ken Stone design: Slope Detector. In a half 
>hour it was on the breadboard and being tested. It does have a problem 
>which may be caused by a bad connection on the breadboard. First step 
>after the usual checking for user mistakes is to rebuild it on another 
>board (no problem for such a simple circuit). Obviously for bigger 
>circuits this can be a chore. But this is my school and my educational 
>process.
>
>That's my 2cents,
>peng
>
><http://home.comcast.net/~peng5002/mainpage.htm>http://home.comcast.net/~peng5002/mainpage.htm
>
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         -Jim
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http://www.oldcrows.net/~patchell

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